What does your logo say about you?

We like to think we don’t judge a book by its cover but without realising, we often do.  We judge labels, covers and promotional materials every day. And the more we see them, the more we begin to view them as trustworthy and recognisable sources.

Some we’ve become so familiar with, we decide to continuously choose them over hundreds of others. McDonalds over the local greasy spoon cafe, Sainsbury’s over the local greengrocer’s etc. So why is that?

The Importance of a Great Logo

Well, one of the biggest parts of establishing a respected brand is designing a great logo. Many factors make up our opinions of a company and it can all stem from having that all-important symbol to identify it by. After all, this is how you are choosing to represent your company, so it’s an crucial one to get right.

The Ingredients to a Successful Logo

Colour

The colour you choose does mean something to your customers. Think about how certain colours affect you when you see them. Then think about what your brand represents. If you choose bright colours, it portrays that you are a bold & exciting company – it may appeal to young people & of course, it will catch everyone’s eye.  Every colour in the spectrum represents something different, so choose wisely.

Type Style

Picking your font is equally as important. As soon as you see those Coca Cola curves, you know exactly what you’re getting. It’s become a ‘cool’ drink, it has a creative flair all down to that fancy typeface.

Accompanying images

If you want an image to go with your type, that has got to sum up exactly what you want your brand to be known for. If you are an environmentally-friendly company, an image of a plant spells that out or go a bit quirky with it to grab even more attention.  At CWDmedia, I like to try and think outside the box when a client’s brief allows it – the chances are that the most obvious idea has probably been done before, and it’s the well thought out, original ideas that stick in your mind and work best as a marketing tool.

The job of your logo is to spell out your company’s message. It’s got to be adjustable to fit across different platforms, so you don’t want it to be too complicated, but you want it to encapsulate exactly what you’re all about.  A golden rule I live by when it comes to logo design is “if it isn’t legible when it’s the size of a postage stamp, bin it”.  Sometimes I have to bend that rule, admittedly, but it’s a healthy ethos to adopt.

 

CWDmedia has bags of experience in logo design. Get in touch today!

Top 10 Tips for Non-Graphic Designers

In times of financial difficulty, one of the first departments to have its budget cut is Marketing.  The job of putting together advert designs or brochures can fall to a Marketing Manager or Assistant with little or no knowledge of what it takes to put a solid layout together.  They might be armed with Adobe Creative Suite, but often it’s a case of ‘all the gear and no idea!’  

Similarly, small businesses often have someone juggling marketing, sales and who knows what else because it’s preferential to hiring a dedicated resource.

Let’s assume you’re in that position, but your boss has granted you some budget to get your design work outsourced.  It can be tricky when putting a project together to understand what your graphic designer really needs from you. But you can actually plan a lot in advance, which will save you both time and money as a result, keeping that boss of yours happy.

So here’s our top 10 musts for non-graphic designers:

  1. First up when you’re thinking about sending images over, make sure they’re high res and bear in mind the print bleed. You will lose around 3mm of image after printing and trimming, so if there are bits that you really want to see, make sure they are not going to be too close to the edges.
  2. Research the type style (fonts) you would like to use in advance. Do you want a serif or sans serif style? Bold or handwritten? Establish what kind of tone you want to set for your work and pick a typeface that reflects it.
  3. Think about sizing. Plan out how big you want your type and images to be – get the idea across at the start and it keeps it all nice and easy.
  4. Colour is very important, so remember to provide specific Pantone references if you have certain colours in mind. Then, you can be assured it will be right.  If you’re not sure with this, your graphic designer will be able to help you.
  5. Get super specific – if you want your brochure to be folded in a certain way just spell it out. Designers like specifics, and so do printers.
  6. Save your work as a PDF.  This is the best form for designers to work with.  Adobe InDesign has various presets to help you export your work to PDF.
  7. Think about what style of paper you would like your finished project to go on. There are varying finishes including matte & gloss. Which would you prefer?
  8. Time is of the essence so plan your project from your deadline backwards and add days for contingency.
  9. The most important tip of them all: PROOFREAD your copy, read it repeatedly and get your colleagues to do the same. You don’t want mistakes and neither does your designer.
  10. If you have to make any changes let people know as soon as possible, and remember – once you’ve signed off a proof, if your work comes back and there’s an error you missed while proofreading, that’s your fault – not the printer’s!

Doing the above will ensure a faster turnaround, a happy relationship between designer and client, less time/money wastage and a better quality of work.